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  #1  
Old 31st January 2009, 11:14 AM
shadowcaster shadowcaster is offline
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Default Insurance Questions

OK we all know that Insurance Co's will try their hardest to not pay out, I know that I have to give details of mods/upgrads carried out on my Discovery. If I did not declare my suspension lift effectivly I would not be insured in fact anything including spot lights, roof lights ect must be declared even a change of tyre size.

So having got your SVA/IVA with all the safty things like covers over exposed bolts/nuts, correctly radioused things like the cycle wings and no protrusions on the dash ect. Then you get it home and begin all the mods you wish to carry out therefor changing the car from what the testers deemed as safe, how do you stand on insurance. For instance you want to adjust the steering/suspension and remove the safty covers but don't bother to put them back, you have carried out a modifaction which should be declared and made the car unsafe in the eyes of the SVA/IVA testers. Or you decide that the switches on the dash are not what you really like so you change them to the old fashioned type switches, You then have a minor accedent and your passenger injures themselves on the protruding switch. Will the insurance also deem the mods as being unsafe and refuse to pay out.
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Old 31st January 2009, 12:20 PM
Chris Gibbs
 
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It's an interesting point.

I haven't seen any test case, but in theory it could be a problem.

I suppose the answer is to leave all the trim etc in place, although I don't think the post accident inspection would be that detailed unless the was a very serious accident.

I've got a friend that works for Adrian Flux, I'll ask him and get back to you.

Cheers

Chris
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Old 31st January 2009, 02:46 PM
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Bonzo Bonzo is offline
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Rich, in theory yes, in reality probably not.

In accepting you premium, they would also be accepting liability of an already modified vehicle.

In the event of an accident, it is unlikely that the averge Joe at the body shop who will make the initial assesment will have the faintest idea of the type/sva approval regs.

As chris has said, an assesment of damage would not be that detailed.

You have a fair point though.

If you had an accident involving the fatality of a pedestrian, the vehicle would be certainly be inspected more closely.
At the end of the day though, it would have to be shown that the fatalaty, was a direct result of change or changes made to the vehicle.
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Old 31st January 2009, 09:49 PM
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Bonzo Bonzo is offline
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Default Disclosure of information.

As an afterthought to my previous post.

There is probably no reason as to why you cannot inform your insurrer of any minor mods you make to your car once it has passed its sva/iva.

It will be highly unlikely that it would affect your premium or withdrawal of cover.

If you go for a megga increase of engine size or type then it will be accepted that a higher premium will apply.
Only a very young or inexperienced driver is likely to have a policy declined due to engine size.

The average insurance clerk would not have a clue about sva/iva regs. When you tell them about a change of instument pannel or the addition of switches. It will just be entered onto you file.
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Old 31st January 2009, 11:21 PM
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If your thoughtful during the build process you should be able to build a car that will pass sva and not need changes after.

I personally think it’s a good idea to keep all the bolt covers etc on the front end. a) Because they keep evil rust out and b) should you hit someone you have no comebacks in relation to the cars safety.

As mentioned above if you have a serious accident and people are injured, it won’t matter if it was your fault or not. Investigators will go over the car with a tooth comb and throw the book at you if it’s non compliant.



If changing something can hurt someone other than you, best not to fiddle. If it can only hurt you that’s your choice so go for it.
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Old 1st February 2009, 10:09 AM
shadowcaster shadowcaster is offline
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Thanks Chris it will be interestin to hear what they say. The questions I raised guys were hyperthecal, and I intend to build mine to the IVA regs. However I'm sure you have all read posts on the Locost forum about post SVA mods, such as adding a windscreen or weather protection. Question is how much does the canvas roof cut down visability, would the car pass the SVA/IVA with it in place.

You may thinks I'm asking stuped questions but I think things like this are going to be looked at much more closely in the future. The story recently of the guy who caused the death of his four children with his modified Land Rover highlights many things that the law will be looking at. Setting aside the fact that his car was poorly maitained, the prosicution also said that many of the mods carried our were ill advised, would fitting non SVA bonnet clips be ill advised. The Land Rover community followed the case closely and questions were raised about modding, one possible effect will be, I would think, a steep rise in costs for insurance for anything other than a completly standard car. I know I pay an exter priemum for the suspension lift, larger tyres and spots/roofrack, I don't mind paying the extra but for how long will we be allowed to carry out such mods.

Also it would seem that the SVA test is not as uniform as we would think, one instance last week I read was a car failed the SVA for not having a heat shield on the exhaust, yet another passed with no problems.

Sorry to ramble on about this but cases like the above will mean a definate hardening of attitude by the Law and insurance co's, and in this increasingly litigious socity we need to be very vigulent in how we go about our hobby.
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It does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not stop.
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Last edited by shadowcaster : 1st February 2009 at 10:17 AM.
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  #7  
Old 1st February 2009, 11:25 AM
flyerncle flyerncle is offline
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Ronnie has hit the nail squarely on the head, Duty of Disclosure is the essential part of the contract, so basically if you dont tell them and you have an accident and they find any little thing not diclosed or different they will try to not pay out.
I had an X3 BMW sitting in our storage for eight months and in the end was told to dispose of it for the same reason.

Hope this makes sense....
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